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Teacher's Collective
BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY

“No one can whistle a symphony. It takes a whole orchestra to play it.”

- Halford E. Luccock
Purpose

Teaching is often seen as an act of individual effort – a mindset that usually leads to teachers working in their own silos. Effective performance of teachers is largely dependent on the quality of their interpersonal relationships with other members of the teaching community, and eventually in their ability to collaborate towards a commonly agreed goal. Therefore, any work for teachers’ empowerment cannot avoid looking in to the intellectual and emotional aspects of teachers’ interpersonal relationships. In order to leverage teaching to the next high level, we must strive to build a robust teaching community, characterised by deep emotional connect, trust, respect and active collaboration among the teachers.

Teachers’ Collective

In Teachers’ Collective, we invite teachers to take a dip in to the mysteries of inter personal relationships and explore the dynamics of effective team work. The module adopts a twin approach to help build high performing teams. Using psychometric instruments and proven frameworks, it creates deep awareness about the complexities of interpersonal relationships, and help participants explore patterns of relations among the team members. On the other hand the module addresses issues of core competencies of team work and help members identify strengths and dysfunctions on the existing team. In an engaging format, the participants confront the current reality, and build a high performing team with shared leadership, commitment and mutual accountability .

Usefulness
  • EFFECTIVE INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP
  • HIGH TRUST AND COLLABORATION
  • DEVELOPING A COMMON GOAL FOR THE SCHOOL
  • HIGH OWNERSHIP AND COMMITMENT TO TASK
Key Deliverables: 2 and ½ Days Residential Module

Through a process of critical exploration, powerful experiences and meaningful dialogue, the module helps participant explore the following areas :

CORE AREA INSIGHT/SKILL DEVELOPMENT
HIGHER BENCHMARK Ability to understand perceived limitations and factors to playing safe and low benchmarking. Ability to take risk and set higher benchmark, leading to unleashing potential of self, team and students.
POSITIVE EXPECTATION Understand the phycology of conditioned behaviour and fear of failure. Ability to shift paradigm towards positive expectation from self and others, leading to high performance
TRUST AND COLLABORATION Developing higher level of trust based on genuine understanding and respect for each other, leading to WIN-WIN situation.
TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Ability to work as a team, with a common goal and shared values.
INTERPERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS Developing a genuine care, concern and connect with others with skills to have real conversations and feedback.
WORK EFFECTIVENESS Creating a road map for higher effectiveness at work and unleashing potential of students.
Psychometric Instrument: Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship Orientation - Behaviour (FIRO - B)

The program uses William Schutz’s FIRO – B instrument to help participants understand interpersonal needs and relationships, and creating individual profile of each member. This will help participants to know and appreciate self and others at a deeper and informed level

Conceptual Framework

Out concepts on teams is influenced by the pioneering work of several key social and organisational psychologists, including the work of Robert Rosenthal on the power of positive expectations, and Jon Katzenbach on the core competencies of effective team. While these have helped us understand the dynamics of teamwork and design our interventions, as a reference framework for participants to understand team dynamics, we use Patrick Lencioni’s Five Dysfunctions of a Team model. The model explores the five fundamental dysfunctions typical in teams and demonstrates the cascading relationships between the dysfunctions. The program will help participants to explore the team’s strengths and identify typical dysfunctions

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